Comments

  1. Since when is it against anyone's policy to help someone in need. If we are that concerned about the litigious nature of our society that we can't help someone in a life threatening situation then we need to do some real soul searching and change some laws. The arguments that the family makes, is not the way most people in this country would react. Most people would expect that some one could have come to her aid, even if it was a failed attempt, some one showed their humanity and at least tried to do something.

    When we as a society are more concerned about a law suit than a human life, we better look at ourselves in the mirror and ask ourselves, is this really a turn that we want our morals, values and principals to take? Because if it is, then we are all in trouble.

    Common sense took a beating this week, it's time for us as a people to bring it back.

    Joe Lucido
    Director
    Alzheimer's Research Association <a href="http://www.alzra.org” target=”_blank”>www.alzra.org

  2. Amen to Joe Lucido's comment. The combine of Brookdale, Glenwood Gardens, and Jeffrey Toomer are collectively culpable for this tragic event. At best, they failed to assure proper staff training for such emergencies, which are almost inevitable (if not predictable) in senior residence facilities. To make matters worse, they have compounded their negligence with a succession of flimsy excuses, confusing statements of company policy, and inconscionable buck-passing. A fundamental reason the elderly pay big bucks to reside in these "safe havens" is to save their lives in the event of a life threatening medical emergency. Sans that "safety net", they'd be better off saving their money and living at home alone, or with modest in-home support.

  3. The report is that the patient was made comfortable on the floor with her head tilted back to open the airway. How likely is it that more vigorous CPR would have done more harm than good with broken ribs and worse? What is the probability that she might have been revived had the instructions been followed? What were the medical qualifications of the 911 operator giving commands relative to nurse who was on the scene?